Middle River bail bondsman who assisted former BPD sergeant with robberies, selling drugs sentenced to prison

Arrested HandcuffsA Middle River man will be spending half a decade in prison.

A judge on Friday sentenced Donald Stepp, 51, of Middle River, to five years in prison, followed by five years of supervised release, for possession with the intent to distribute cocaine, heroin, and other controlled dangerous substances. Stepp obtained the drugs from former Baltimore Police Department Sergeant Wayne Jenkins, and from robberies in which he participated with Jenkins and other BPD officers.

According to his plea agreement, Stepp operated Double D Bail Bonds and was an associate of former BPD Sergeant Wayne Jenkins. From 2015-2017, Stepp obtained significant quantities of narcotics from Jenkins and robbed citizens of their property, including drugs, cash, and watches.

Advertisement

To facilitate the robberies and drug trafficking, Jenkins brought Stepp to search locations in Baltimore City and Baltimore County, and falsely represented to other law enforcement agencies that Stepp was an officer with BPD. Jenkins would travel to Stepp’s residence after he had robbed citizens and Stepp would store the stolen drugs in his tool shed. Stepp then sold the stolen drugs and returned hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash proceeds to BPD officers. Jenkins took a portion of the proceeds from the drug sales and paid other officers in the BPD who participated in the robberies with Jenkins and Stepp.

On December 14, 2017, law enforcement executed a search warrant at Stepp’s residence and recovered approximately 423 grams of crack cocaine, 262 grams of cocaine, 14 grams of heroin, 28 grams of MDMA, digital scales, packaging material, a large sum of cash, and several high-value watches.

On June 7, 2018, Wayne Jenkins was sentenced to 25 years in federal prison for racketeering conspiracy; racketeering; robbery; destruction, alteration, or falsification of records in a federal investigation; and deprivation of rights under color of law.

Former BPD detective from Joppa sentenced to 18 years in prison

Daniel HerslBALTIMORE, MD – A U.S. District Judge on Friday sentenced former Detective Daniel Thomas Hersl, 48, of Joppa, to 18 years in federal prison, followed by three years of supervised release, for racketeering conspiracy and racketeering offenses, including overtime fraud, and robbery.

A federal jury had previously convicted Hersl on February 12, 2018.

According to evidence presented at the three-week trial, during 2015 and 2016–the time of the racketeering conspiracy–Hersl stole money, property, and narcotics by detaining victims, entering residences, conducting traffic stops, and swearing out false search warrant affidavits.

Advertisement

In addition, Hersl and his co-defendants prepared and submitted false official incident and arrest reports, reports of property seized from arrestees, and charging documents.

In some cases, there was no evidence of criminal conduct by the victims; Hersl and his co-defendant officers stole money that had been earned lawfully. In other instances, narcotics and firearms were recovered from arrestees. In several instances, Hersl and his co-defendants did not file any police reports. The amounts stolen ranged from $200 to $200,000.

Seven co-defendants have all previously been convicted of federal racketeering charges. Of those, five have been sentenced to between seven and 25 years in prison.

Former BPD detective from Middle River sentenced to 7 years in prison

Maurice Kilpatrick WardBaltimore, MD – A U.S. District Judge on Friday sentenced former Detective Evodio Calles Hendrix, 32, of Randallstown, and former Detective Maurice Kilpatrick Ward, 36, of Middle River, for racketeering conspiracy.

Hendrix was sentenced to seven years in prison, followed by three years of supervised release. Ward was also sentenced to seven years in prison, followed by three years of supervised release. Hendrix and Ward were formerly members of the Baltimore Police Department’s Gun Trace Task Force (“GTTF”).

According to the plea agreements, Hendrix and Ward admitted to participating in four robberies from February through August. Hendrix and Ward also admitted that they were armed with their Baltimore Police Department (BPD) service firearms during the robberies, that individual victims of the robberies were physically restrained to facilitate the commission of the offenses, and that they authored false and fraudulent incident reports and other official documents in some cases in order to conceal their criminal conduct and otherwise obstruct justice.

On February 17, 2016, Ward and one of his co-defendants stole $500 from an arrestee. Ward then authored a false BPD incident report to conceal the robbery.

On March 22, 2016, Hendrix and Ward admitted that they, along with two of their co-defendants, robbed a safe they found in the basement of a house they were searching, stealing more than $200,000 in the basement of a house they were searching.

Advertisement

Similarly, on June 24, 2016, while executing a search warrant in a home, Hendrix stole money and later, after the search, gave a portion of it to Ward.

On August 24, 2016, Hendrix stole money from an arrestee and then gave a portion of the cash to Ward.

Hendrix and Ward also admitted that they and their co-defendants routinely submitted false and fraudulent individual overtime reports defrauding the Baltimore Police Department and the citizens of the State of Maryland. On these reports, Ward, Hendrix and their co-conspirators falsely certified that they worked their entire regularly assigned shifts, when they did not, and that they worked additional hours for which they received overtime pay, when they had not worked all and in some cases any of those overtime hours.

According to their plea agreements, Hendrix and Ward also admitted that they submitted false and fraudulent overtime reports on behalf of their co-defendants, with their co-defendants’ knowledge and at their direction, and that their co-defendants submitted false and fraudulent overtime reports on their behalf in return.

They both admitted that the practice at the GTTF was that if a sub-set of the GTTF had a gun arrest, all members of the GTTF, regardless of whether they had actually participated in the arrest, would submit individual overtime reports, as if they did, and receive salary and overtime for it.

United States Attorney Robert K. Hur commended the FBI for its work in the investigation. Mr. Hur thanked Assistant U.S. Attorneys Leo J. Wise and Derek E. Hines, who prosecuted these Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force cases.

Former police sergeant from Middle River sentenced to 25 years for racketeering, robberies, overtime fraud, planting evidence

Officer Wayne JenkinsBaltimore, MD – On Thursday, U.S. District Judge sentenced Sergeant Wayne Earl Jenkins, 37, of Middle River, to 25 years in federal prison, followed by 3 years of supervised release, for one count of racketeering conspiracy, one count of racketeering, two counts of robbery, one count of destruction, alteration, or falsification of records in a federal investigation, and four counts of deprivation of rights under color of law.

Jenkins has pleaded guilty to the charges back in January.

Jenkins joined the Baltimore Police Department on February 20, 2003 and was promoted to Sergeant on November 20, 2013. On June 13, 2016, Jenkins became the Officer in Charge of the Gun Trace Task Force (GTTF), a specialized unit within the Operational Investigation Division of the BPD. According to the plea agreement, Jenkins schemed to steal money, property, and narcotics by detaining victims, entering residences, conducting traffic stops, and swearing out false search warrant affidavits.

In addition, Jenkins prepared and submitted false official incident and arrest reports, reports of property seized from arrestees, and charging documents. The false reports concealed the fact that Jenkins and his co-conspirators had stolen money, property, and narcotics from individuals.

According to his plea agreement, Jenkins admitted that he participated in seven separate robberies between May 2011 and August 2016. Jenkins also stole dirt bikes from individuals who were riding them illegally on city streets and then sold them through an associate.

In addition to the robberies, Jenkins also admitted to stealing 4-5 boxes, containing approximately 12 pounds, of high-grade marijuana that had been intercepted by law enforcement from the U.S. mail, as well as prescription medicines that he had stolen from someone looting a pharmacy during the April 2015 riots. Jenkins admitted he gave D.S. drugs he stole from detainees and arrestees, including cocaine, marijuana and heroin. D.S. was able to sell the drugs and shared the proceeds with Jenkins. In total, D.S. paid Jenkins $200,000 to $250,000 of drug proceeds.

In an effort to conceal his true identity, Jenkins told detainees and arrestees that he was a federal task force officer, which he was not, and told his co-defendants to identify him as the U.S. Attorney.

Jenkins admitted to obstructing law enforcement by alerting his co-defendants about potential investigations of their criminal conduct. Jenkins learned that Gondo and Rayam were under investigation from other BPD officers, then shared this information with his co-defendants. When Jenkins, Gondo, Hendrix, Hersl, Rayam, Taylor and Ward were detained in the Howard County Detention Center, Jenkins directed the defendants to “keep their mouths shut” and “stick to the story,” or words to that effect, in an effort to obstruct justice.

Jenkins has also pleaded guilty to planting evidence and authoring a false police report which resulted in the conviction and imprisonment of two Baltimore City men in 2010.

According to the plea agreement, Jenkins admitted that he routinely submitted false and fraudulent individual overtime reports, thereby defrauding the Baltimore Police Department and the citizens of the State of Maryland. On these reports, Jenkins falsely certified that he worked his entire regularly assigned shifts, when he did not, and that he worked additional hours for which he received overtime pay, when he had not worked all and in some cases any of those overtime hours. Jenkins also admitted that he submitted false and fraudulent overtime reports on behalf of his co-defendants.

United States Attorney Robert K. Hur commended the FBI for its work in the investigation. Hur thanked Assistant U.S. Attorneys Leo J. Wise and Derek E. Hines, who prosecuted these Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force cases.

S. Dallas Dance sentenced to six months in jail

Dallas DanceState Prosecutor Emmet C. Davitt announced on Friday morning that S. Dallas Dance, former superintendent of Baltimore County Public Schools, had been sentenced after pleading guilty in March to four counts of perjury arising from false filings of his Financial Disclosure Statements for 2012, 2013, and 2015.

Judge Kathleen G. Cox imposed a sentence of 5 years, and  suspended all but 6 months.

That time period will be followed by a period of 2 years supervised probation, upon which Dance will be required to complete 700 hours of community service.

He has a turn-in date of Friday, April 27, 2018.