Twelve schools win Team BCPS Clean Green 15 Litter Challenge

baltimore-county-public-schools-bcpsBaltimore County is a little bit cleaner and greener thanks to the efforts of school children and community members who participated in this year’s Team BCPS Clean Green 15 Litter Challenge.

County Executive Don Mohler, Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Verletta White, and Debbie Phelps, Executive Director of the Education Foundation of Baltimore County Public Schools, announced on Tuesday morning that twelve Baltimore County public schools were winners in this program, which resulted in thousands of volunteers participating in more than three hundred litter clean-ups around the county over the past year.

“We are just delighted with the enthusiastic response we’ve gotten to this program from our students, teachers and groups in the community who take pride in helping to clean up our neighborhoods and keep litter out of our waterways and the environment,” Mohler said.

“The Clean Green 15 Challenge is an effective, real-world way for our students to learn about the environment as they demonstrate pride in their schools and communities,” said BCPS Superintendent Verletta White.

“The Clean Green 15 challenge is a great, hands-on way for students and community members to get involved and make a difference by putting litter in its place,” said Baltimore County Council Chair Julian Jones.

Clean Green 15 Results:

Tons of Litter Collected, Thousands of Grant Dollars Distributed to Schools

The 2018 program resulted in 338 clean-ups conducted by 5,057 volunteers who picked up 3,471 bags of litter and debris. This is a 29% increase in volunteers over last year!

In addition to litter, Clean Green 15 volunteers collected many tons of bulk trash items from parks, stream banks, schoolyards and other locations around Baltimore County. Clean-ups included schoolchildren as well as community-based volunteer activity.

Through the Team BCPS Clean Green 15 Litter Challenge, the Education Foundation of Baltimore County Public Schools awarded grants to the top winning schools to fund school-based instructional projects emphasizing the theme of environmental literacy.  Examples could include installing a reading garden or rain garden, planting trees, diverting downspouts, or environmental education projects. Six schools won Honorable Mention awards and received technology prizes.

Team BCPS Clean Green 15 Litter Challenge 

Winning Schools—2018

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AwardPrizeSchool
Grand Prize—Volunteers$3,000 grantReisterstown Elementary School
Grand Prize—Weight$3,000 grantGeneral John Stricker Middle School
Elementary Schools Prize$1,500 grantChesapeake Terrace Elementary School
Middle Schools Prize$1,500 grantParkville Middle School and Center for Technology
High Schools Prize$1,500 grantDulaney High School
Special Schools Prize$1,500 grantBattle Monument School
Honorable MentioniPadBear Creek Elementary School
Honorable MentioniPadEdgemere Elementary School
Honorable MentioniPadLansdowne High School
Honorable MentioniPadMilbrook Elementary School
Honorable MentioniPadPerry Hall Middle School
Honorable MentioniPadStoneleigh Elementary School

2018 Sponsors:

BGE, Comcast, Baltimore County Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability

Remnants of Florence cause mudslide, closed roads

Hurricane FlorenceThe remnants of Hurricane Florence began pushing through the Nottingham area in the wee hours on Tuesday.

Thunderstorms and heavy rains were reported in many areas overnight.

At about 3:30 a.m., the Baltimore County Fire Department reported that a vehicle had become submerged in flood waters at Pulaski Highway and Philadelphia Road in Rosedale.  The vehicle was unoccupied.

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At about 5 a.m., the State Highway Administration reported that Route 43 had been shut down at US-1 due to a mudslide.  Other local roadways also had to be closed overnight.  They have all since been reopened.

The National Weather Service says another round of storms will likely move through the area on Tuesday afternoon.

A flash flood watch is in effect for the Nottingham area until 6 p.m.

Winners of Baltimore County’s Clean Green 15 anti-litter initiative to be announced at Parkville Middle

Parkville Middle SchoolBaltimore County Public Schools Interim Superintendent Verletta White and Baltimore County Executive Don Mohler will announce the 12 winning schools of the annual “Team BCPS Clean Green 15 Litter Challenge.”

The announcement will be made at Parkville Middle School on Tuesday at 11 a.m.

The top performing schools will be awarded grants to create environmental projects. This year, the litter challenge involved more than 5,000 volunteers who participated in 338 clean-ups throughout Baltimore County, resulting in the removal of tons of trash from school and community properties. The anti-litter initiative encouraged BCPS schools and community organizations to conduct litter clean-ups and anti-littering outreach this past year.

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Debbie Phelps, executive director of The Education Foundation of BCPS, will serve as the program emcee.

Through the initiative, participating groups registered their “Clean Green” events on the BCPS website and designated which BCPS school would receive credit for their efforts. Environmental literacy grants from The Education Foundation of BCPS are awarded to schools based on the clean-up activity credited to winning schools as well as other anti-litter education and outreach efforts.

Grants are to be used for school-based instruction that emphasizes the theme of environmental literacy. Sponsors include BGE, The Education Foundation of BCPS, the Baltimore County Department of Environmental Protection and Sustainability, and BCPS.

Parkville Middle School is located at 8711 Avondale Road in Parkville (21234).

 

Councilman Marks, volunteers organize 2018 Indian Rock Park cleanup

On Saturday, September 15, volunteers cleaned up Perry Hall’s Indian Rock Park, picking up copious amounts of garbage.

Councilman David Marks organized the third such clean-up of the park, which stretches between Silver Spring Road and Ebenezer Road west of Perry Hall High School.

This year, boost in support was provided by FC USA Soccer who provided several volunteers for the project.

“This is the third cleanup organized by our office,” said Councilman Marks. “The good news is that there is far less trash than ever before.”

Officials preparing for potential localized flooding from Hurricane Florence

Hurricane FlorenceAlthough the current projected track of Hurricane Florence would appear to take the storm south of the Baltimore area, County Executive Don Mohler and his top public safety and public health team gathered at Bowleys Quarters Volunteer Fire Rescue and Marine this morning to advise residents to stay alert to possible changes and prepare in case of localized coastal and inland flooding or power outages from downed trees.

The storm is expected to stall and produce heavy rains, which could lead to some inland and coastal flooding throughout the south and possibly in the Mid-Atlantic region.

“The Memorial Day weekend flooding in Catonsville, Ellicott City, Oella and Turner Station was an unwelcome reminder of our vulnerability, and that it doesn’t take a direct hit from a hurricane to ruin homes and businesses and cause prolonged power outages and possible loss of life,” Mohler said.

Mohler reminded residents to monitor Baltimore County’s social media channels for storm-related updates.

“Providing accurate, timely information to our citizens during an emergency is a top priority for us,” he said. “During storms and other emergencies, we push out frequent updates via Twitter and on our Baltimore County Fire Department Facebook page.”

Baltimore County emergency managers will continue to receive regular updates throughout this weather event and will provide updates on social media as needed.

“Living in eastern Baltimore County and along the waterfront myself, I am particularly grateful to all of our career and volunteer fire service, police officers and public works staff who stand ready to jump into action if necessary to protect people if this storm should cause problems,” said Councilwoman Cathy Bevins.

Fire and Public Works Crews are Prepared and Ready to Respond

The Baltimore County Fire Department and the Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management will continue to monitor the storm and will be prepared to respond if needed.

The Baltimore County Department of Public Works (DPW) has placed special emphasis this week on checking their equipment and clearing storm drain inlets to help reduce flooding potential. DPW warns that the saturated ground from recent rainy weather means that trees can be vulnerable to toppling from lighter winds than usual. County tree crews and contractors are ready to clear trees that may fall into roadways and the public right of way.

DPW asks residents to help by reporting any problems that may occur including blocked inlets and downed trees to the Bureau of Highways using the BaltCoGo mobile app. The app is offered free of charge to Android and iPhone users and may be downloaded from their respective app stores. Residents may also call the Bureau of Highways at 410-887-3560.